solaRescue

solaRescue

We believe that everyone should have access to basic, uninterrupted medical care

Because of this, we work with Malawian doctors to implement our Solar Suction Surgery System, otherwise known as the S4. This device harnesses the power of the sun to provide the necessary power during vital surgeries and health care procedures while also supporting surgical suction pumps. The S4 is a literal life saver for communities that are unable to power even the most basic medical machines, or communities with inconsistent power supply.

Donations to solaRescue will provide funds for the creation of more S4s to provide power for Malawian hospitals. Intellectual donations may be implemented into the design of the S4 to better serve these impoverished communities.

Using Sunlight To Save Lives

How solaRescue works to help the people of Malawi using solar powered devices such as the s4

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Malawi’s Need

Developing nations, such as Malawi, are in desperate need of reliable and renewable energy resources, especially in medical facilities, where having power can be the difference between life and death

91% of Malawians are Without Electricity

91% of Malawians lack access to electricity. That’s nearly 15 million people left in the dark. Those that do have access to electricty often exprience frequent outages.

The World's Poorest Country

Malawi is the world’s poorest country in the world based upon GDP per capita. A majority of Malawians live on less than $1 a day.

Malawian Life Expectancy is 61 Years

Malawi ranks 200 out of 220 nations in life expectancy. Limited access to medical care and a high risk of disease lead to many early deaths.

1 in 10 Malawian Chilren Die Before the Age of 5

The limited access to electricity also limits the treatment options within hospitals. Many of these deaths could be prevented with basic medical care and procedures that are difficult or impossible without power.

Our Device: The Solar Suction Surgery System (S4)

The S4 stores solar energy and provides power to lighting, suction machines, and other auxiliary services that are critical during medical procedures. These devices were first implemented, free of charge, at Embangweni Mission Hospital in 2013. This hospital serves over 100,000 individuals. The hospital and other surrounding clinics have used these devices as reliable back-up power in surgery rooms, which has had a direct impact on infant mortality rates.

This situation is not unique to Malawi. Raised awareness and increased funding would allow for other hospitals in developing areas around the world to recive the power they need for their patients to recive proper care.

The Embangweni Mission Hospital, as well as other hosiptals and clinics, have requested more of these life saving devices.

How You Can Help

The people of Malawi are in desperate need of effective and reliable medical care. You can make a difference by raising awareness of this issue, donating financially, or submitting your own solar powered designs

Help Today

Donate

Donate to provide S4s to Malawian hospitals free of charge

Your donations to solaRescue will go directly towards producing S4s to be implemented in Malawian hospitals free of charge

solaRescue will use 100% of your donations to produce life saving devices for the people of Malawi

Your donation can be the difference between life and death for people in need of emergency medical care

Designs

Submit your own or share our solar powered designs to help those in need

We are freely sharing the design of the Solar Suction Surgery System we created in our open source repository website and welcoming others who have also invented devices to share their designs to be replicated all over the world

Use our designs to create more life saving solar devices

Submit your own solar energy designs to be produced to help others

Raise Awareness

Raise awareness of the struggles Malawian hospitals face via social media

Share the struggles of Malawi with your friends, and the life saving power of solar powered devices such as the S4

 

Help raise awareness of Malawi’s need for reliable energy

"When there's no power, there's no lights, and you're really struggling to feel for an IV... many times the patient dies before that happens. Tragedies that could have been avoided happen, and children die."

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Dr. Martha Sommers

Former Embangweni Mission Hospital Director

"Almost every day there is a period of no less than 6 hours that we don't have power... this is a challenge."

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Dr. Ishmael Nyirenda

Embangweni Mission Hospital Officer in Charge

"If there's no power, it means our operations are on stand-still, and that can lead to loss of lives."

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Dr. Ishmael Nyirenda

Embangweni Mission Hospital Officer in Charge

solaRescue in the News

solaRescue
Meeting with Hospital Administration and S4 Tutorial

Meeting with Hospital Administration and S4 Tutorial

The team met with hospital administrators about installing the S4. Later, they had a class
Touchdown In Malawi

Touchdown In Malawi

After an 18 hour flight, Jacob along with 2 engineering students and a professor from
Meet Jacob!

Meet Jacob!

Jacob is a student at Grand Valley State University and dreams of being a dentist.
Presentation at the Midwest Public Affairs Conference

Presentation at the Midwest Public Affairs Conference

Jacob Deming, Professor Swift and Pradeep Charath presented the solaRescue initiative at the Midwest Public
Meeting with Doctor in Malawi

Meeting with Doctor in Malawi

Engineering students and members of solaRescue video chatted with Dr. Martha Sommers in Malawi to
Cision

Cision

Cision: Students build solar devices for rural hospital in Africa  
PRWeb

PRWeb

PRWeb: Students build solar devices for rural hospital in Africa  
GVNow

GVNow

GVNow: Students build solar devices for rural hospital in Africa  
Engineering.com

Engineering.com

Engineering.com: Engineering Grad Students Design Solar Power System for Hospitals in Rural Africa   
GR Business Journal

GR Business Journal

Grand Rapids Business Journal: College students build life-saving solar device for African hospital